HFD

Hild Family Dental

5323 N 134th Avenue, Ph: (402) 492-9303


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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is an Implant?
  2. What is a Veneer?
  3. When Should I Take My Child to the Dentist for the First Time?
  4. Are Silver Fillings Safe?
  5. What is a Cavity?
  6. What is Gingivitis?
  7. How Often Should I Get a Dental Check Up and Cleaning?
  8. How Often Should I Brush My Teeth?
  9. How Often Should I Floss My Teeth?
  10. How Often Should I Change My Toothbrush?
  11. What is Plaque?
  12. What Causes Bad Breath?
  13. What is Halitosis?
  14. What are Dental Sealants?
  15. What is the Difference Between a Silver and White Filling?
  16. What is an Orthodontist?
  17. What is a Prosthodontist?
  18. What is an Endodontist?
  1. What is an Implant?
    A dental implant is a metal device designed to replace missing teeth. The device is usually made out of titanium and is surgically placed into the jawbone where the tooth is missing. Unlike a dental bridge, an implant is permanent. A dental implant is designed to act as the tooth root and can anchor an artificial tooth or teeth such as a crown, bridge or denture.

  2. What is a Veneer?
    A veneer is a thin shell made out of porcelain or composite material. They are custom made and cemented to the front side of the tooth. A veneer can be used to treat dental conditions such as a slightly crooked tooth, discolored teeth, chipped teeth or they can even be used to cover spaces in between the teeth. A veneer can be made by the dentist or in a dental laboratory, depending on the materials used and the preference of the dentist.

  3. When Should I Take My Child to the Dentist for the First Time?
    Here at Hild Family Dental we like to see children when they reach the age of three. If you feel that your child has a dental issue prior to age three, please contact us.

  4. Are Silver Fillings Safe?
    Silver (Amalgam) filling material contains about 50% mercury and 50% of various other metals. While there have been no conclusive studies relating the mercury in amalgam to any dangers, mercury by itself is very toxic. With the introduction of new filling materials, amalgam is not used as often as it once was. More than 70 percent of all fillings today are placed with resin or composite materials. Amalgam has been supported as being safe by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, the FDA and the US Public Health Service.

  5. What is a Cavity?
    A cavity is a hole in the tooth that is caused by decay. Decay occurs when plague, the sticky substance that forms on teeth, combines with the sugars and / or starches of the food we eat. This combination produces acids that attack tooth enamel. The best way to prevent tooth decay is brushing twice a day, flossing daily and going to your regular dental check ups. Eating healthy foods and avoiding snacks and drinks that are high in sugar are also ways to prevent decay.

  6. What is Gingivitis?
    Gingivitis is the early stage of gum disease, which can be treated and reversed if diagnosed early. The signs and symptoms are red, swollen and puffy gums that bleed easily. If treatment is not received, gingivitis could progress into periodontitis, an advanced and more serious stage of gum disease which includes bone loss and is not reversible. Gum disease is one of the main causes of tooth loss in adults and has also been linked to heart attacks and strokes. Brushing twice a day, flossing daily, regular dental checkups and dental cleanings are the best preventions against gum disease.

  7. How Often Should I Get a Dental Check Up and Cleaning?
    Most children and adults should get a regular dental cleaning and check up every six months. People at a greater risk for oral diseases should have dental check ups more than twice a year. Tobacco and alcohol use, diabetes, pregnancy, periodontal and gum disease, poor oral hygiene and certain medical conditions are some of the many factors that your dentist takes into consideration when deciding how often you need your dental cleaning and check up. Going to your regular check ups will help to keep your gums and teeth healthy as well as detect any early problems such as gum disease, oral cancer and cavities. The best way to maintain good oral health is to visit your dentist on a regular basis.

  8. How Often Should I Brush My Teeth?
    According to the American Dental Association, you should brush your teeth twice a day. Brushing your teeth helps to remove plaque which causes tooth decay and can lead to gum disease. Always use a soft bristled toothbrush with a toothpaste that contains fluoride. Make sure that the toothbrush fits inside of your mouth so that you can easily reach all areas. When brushing, use gentle back and forth strokes, brushing all sides of the teeth. Always brush your tongue to remove any bacteria and keep your breath fresh.

  9. How Often Should I Floss My Teeth?
    You should floss your teeth at least once a day. Flossing in between your teeth removes food debris and plaque from in between the teeth that a toothbrush can't reach. Plaque causes tooth decay and can lead to gum disease. Another great reason to floss is that recent studies have shown that flossing helps to prevent a heart attack or stroke. When flossing, be sure to gently insert the floss in between the teeth, without snapping, which could damage the gum tissue. Gently move the floss up and down into the spaces between the gum and teeth. Floss the sides of all of your teeth, even if there isn't a tooth next to another one. There are a number of dental products available that are designed to make flossing easier, such as disposable dental flossers.

  10. How Often Should I Change My Toothbrush?
    Adults and children should change their toothbrush every 3 months because they become worn out and are not as effective as they once were. Exceptions to this would be if you were using an electric toothbrush, and the manufacturer states otherwise. Some electric rechargeable toothbrushes have very good brush heads that only need to be changed every 6 months. If you have gum disease, you should change your toothbrush every 4 - 6 weeks because bacteria can harbor in the bristles. You should always rinse your toothbrush out with hot water after every use and change it after you have been sick.

  11. What is Plaque?
    Plaque is the soft and sticky substance that accumulates on the teeth from food debris and bacteria. Plaque can be removed by brushing and flossing thoroughly. If plaque is not removed, it can lead to gum disease and cavities. Regular dental check ups, brushing twice a day, flossing daily and eating nutritional snacks will help to prevent plaque from forming on the teeth.

  12. What Causes Bad Breath?
    According to dental studies, about 85% of people with persistent bad breath (also known as halitosis) have a dental condition that is to blame. If bad breath is the cause of a dental condition, mouthwash will only mask the odor and not cure it. Regular dental check ups & cleanings, flossing daily, and brushing your teeth & tongue twice a day can greatly reduce and possibly eliminate bad breath.

  13. What is Halitosis?
    Halitosis is a clinical name for bad breath. According to dental studies, about 85% of people with bad breath have a dental condition that is to blame. These conditions could be one or more of the following:

    • gum disease
    • cavities
    • poor oral hygiene
    • oral cancer
    • bacteria on the tongue

    Regular dental check ups & cleanings, flossing daily, and brushing your teeth & tongue twice a day can greatly reduce and possibly eliminate halitosis.

  14. What are Dental Sealants?
    Dental sealants are a great way to protect your child's permanent teeth from cavities. Dental sealants are a clear and protective coating that is applied to the biting surfaces of the back teeth. The sealant protects the tooth from getting a cavity by shielding against bacteria and plaque. Sealants are most commonly placed on children's permanent back teeth because they are more prone to cavities. Most insurance companies pay for sealants on children's teeth. They can also be placed on adult's teeth, however, insurance usually won't cover them.

  15. What is the Difference Between a Silver and White Filling?
    The main difference between silver and white dental fillings is the material that they consist of. Silver (amalgam) fillings, are made up of 50% mercury and 50% of other various metals. White (composite) fillings are made up of acrylic and various glass particles. Other differences in silver and white fillings are cost, strength and the way they look.

  16. What is an Orthodontist?
    An orthodontist is a dental specialist that has not only completed college and 4 years of dental school, but has also completed an additional 2 to 3 years residency program accredited by the ADA of advanced education in orthodontics. After receiving the additional years of training and education, an orthodontist has learned the skills that are required to treat the misalignment of teeth and facial development with braces, headgear, retainers and other methods. Only a dentist that has completed the additional years of training and education after dental school is an orthodontist.

  17. What is a Prosthodontist?
    A prosthodontist is a dental specialist who is skilled in the replacement of missing teeth and the restoration of natural teeth. A prosthodontist has graduated from dental school and usually will have three or more years of continuing education after that. This type of dental specialist is trained to deal with complicated and simple restorations of the whole mouth as well as treating facial deformities. Common procedures treated by a prosthodontist may include dentures, partial dentures, fixed bridges, crowns, implants, veneers and more.

  18. What is an Endodontist?
    An Endodontist is a dentist that strictly deals with the nerve of the tooth. They may perform simple to difficult root canal treatments as well as surgical root procedures. They may perform an apicectomy (surgically removing the tip of the root) or a root amputation (removing a root on a multi-rooted tooth). They have usually 2 or more years of continuing education after graduating dental school, and most limit their practice to only endodontics.

Some text credited to Tammy Davenport, Your Guide to Dentistry
http://dentistry.about.com/


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